Can a Limited Liability Company (LLC) issue stock?

It is possible for an LLC to issue something similar to stock, called membership units. Just like stocks, membership units divide up the ownership of the company amongst the owners of the units, allow the owners to vote for the directors of the company, and give them rights to share . . . .

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How is the profit from the sale of our home taxed during a divorce?

There are a few questions imbedded in your bigger question, so I'll be taking them one at a time. Before starting, however, you will likely benefit from talking with a financial professional, at least CPA for doing your taxes this year. To answer your main question, assuming the property was never depreciated as an investment property, your share of the capital gains will be taxed at long-term capital gains rates. This should be a tax of 15% of the capital gain above the exclusion amount.

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Would Getting a Paper Divorce Help Financially?

Yes, getting a paper divorce can help you financially but it can also be a financial negative depending on your personal situation. As with most things with Personal Finance, the answer is it will depend on a large number of factors related to your family's finances. Below are a few of the consideration that immediately spring to mind, which you will want to explore.

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How does one weigh the trade offs between bootstrapping a small business and seeking Venture Capital?

While the concerns over the slower bootstrap method are legitimate and should be considered, I still believe bootstrapping for as long as possible is the way to go for the vast majority of enterprises because of the significant potential downsides of VC and Angel funding. Ultimately the question you want to ask is if it is possible to build your business through bootstrapping considering the concerns you identified. If it is, then I recommend going with bootstrapping as long as you can. Here are potential challenges with getting funding:

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Do I have to buy treasury notes through a bank or brokerage firm?

There are three ways to purchase Treasury notes directly; through a brokerage, through a bank, or directly from the U.S. Treasury. While they are considered free from default risk, Treasury Notes carry significant other risks including interest rate risk and inflation risk. This is especially true with today’s . . . .

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Should I use money from my 403(b) account to pay off my credit card debt?

While the credit card company charging 16% interest is annoying, taking money from your 403(b) or any other retirement account to get rid of the debt may negatively impact you financially. Even though you can take the money out without the 10% penalty, you would still have to pay taxes on the money. You would likely lose money on the deal based on how the math works.

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Can I ask the IRS to allow me to return an IRA distribution after the 60 day rollover period?

Yes, there is potential for relief from the IRS, but ignorance of the rules and weakness in English are most likely going to get denied. At this point you will want to contact a financial advisor and a CPA to help you with this. The CPA will help you in dealing with the IRS and a good financial advisor . . . .

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How are taxes calculated when Bitcoin is exchanged for physical gold and a profit is generated?

The IRS considers Bitcoin, and all virtual currency, to be property and will tax the gains in the property whenever you sell or exchange your Bitcoin for another asset (including gold or even other virtual currency). So you will have to pay taxes on the amount the Bitcoin has increased in value since you bought it. Below are additional key tax issues related to virtual currency . . . .

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Why do stock prices rise over time?

Your analysis is actually correct, in that cash flow and growth rates are constantly changing, and generally they are changing for the better. As a result, future cash flow increases at a faster rate than previously expected and the stock price is adjusted up due to these increasing cash flows. Because no one can predict the future, as new facts become apparent they changes the expectations of future cash flows. This, of course, assumes . . . .

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